By guest contributor

Thanks for stopping by to check out my Babbletype review. There are countless ways to make money online, and to be honest... most are legit, if done properly. Having said that... you wouldn't be the first person to wonder if it's a scam.  

This Babbletype review will go over who they are, what they do, how much you can make, and why some are claiming it's not legit.

Disclaimer:
Please note, I am not a member or an affiliate for Babbletype. This review has been researched with information and/or testimonials that are available online in the public domain. Any recommendations and/or conclusions are strictly opinions and may not apply to, or agree with, all persons or situations. 
See full disclaimer for more info


What is Babbletype?


Babbletype is one of many work-at-home audio transcription sites on the web. There has been a lot of talk about the company, with regard to what it can do for work-at-home freelancers and those seeking an alternative online income source.

Transcription Workstation

With a focus on general transciption, they provide opportunity to newbies  who don't have experience in specialized fields such as legal or medical.

And... in addition to transcription, Babbletype also offers translation and proofreading services.

Is Babbletype a Scam?


Some people are pretty loose with their use of the word scam. There are negative Babbletype reviews out there calling the company a scam... but strictly speaking, Babbletype is a genuine company that pays its workers. In other words, it’s not a scam.

But some have labeled it a scam simply because it does not pay as well as they expect.

The thing you need to know about transcription is that it's not easy. Professional transcribers can often type upwards of 80 or more words per minute with near perfect accuracy. 

They are also proficient at understanding accents, dealing with poor audio quality and separating multiple voices that are talking over one another. It takes experience to become quick and efficient enough to earn a decent wage.

Babbletype is far from being an outright scam. If you do good work, they will pay you, and while it's not much by professional transcriber standards... everyone has to start somewhere.  

If you're looking for bigger paychecks as a transcriptionist and have some experience you might be better off applying to companies like Allegis Transcription or  Accutran Global.

Maybe you're not sure about transcription at all (I know the feeling... even after 30 years of typing daily I couldn't come close to 80 WPM).

Another way you can make money is with online surveys on sites like surveyjunkie.com. You can also make searching the web, visiting websites and playing web-based games with Inbox Dollars.

It's not "freedom" money of course, but it's a good way to make a few extra bucks.  

Another option if you're looking for a full-time income, is an online business.

You may be at home because of a medical issue, kids to take care of or just a difficult job market.  

An online business is the ideal solution for some who are in that situation, and if that's the case, knowing how (and where) to get started is what you need in order to get what you want.

Now, I’m going to give you a free step by step beginner's guide to making money online which you can get by clicking HERE.

 

How Does it Work?


Babbletype works with many companies that need their audio files transcribed into written text. Generally, people report a good flow of assignments.

Again... as many transcription jobs go, Babbletype gigs require good typing speed and accuracy, and you need to be a native English speaker.

Their are three jobs you can do for Babbletype,

  • Transcription - Listening to recorded audio and typing it out.
  • Proofreading - Going over and correcting already transcribed audio.
  • Translation - Translating recorded audio into another language... which of course requires that you have a solid grasp of both your source and target languages.
     

Requirements to Get Started


As mentioned above, you should be a native English speaker to become a transcriptionist with this company. However, you have to take a test to prove that you are up to the demands of the job you are seeking.

You will also need access to a computer, comfortable headset, a high-speed internet connection, and a quiet place to work free of distractions.

It doesn't hurt to have a coffee maker either. ?


How Much Does it Cost?


To join Babbletype, you don’t have to pay anything; whether you want to become a transcriptionist, translator, or a proofreader. 

Of course, you will need the items listed above (computer, headset, etc.) but those are not costs specific to Babbletype.

 
How Much Does Babbletype Pay?


Babbletype pays per/audio minute, and the rate depends on the skill required.

  • Transcription - 45 cents average per audio minute.
  • Proofreading (transcriptions) - 13 - 18 cents per audio minute transcribed
  • Translation - $1.30 - $1.60 per audio minute

Using transcription as an example, if you get a 3 minute audio clip and spend ten minutes transcribing it, you will be paid for 3 minutes of audio... or 3 x $0.45.

This is where speed and accuracy come in. If your typing fingers can't keep up with the audio and you have to keep going back to check your work... transcription is not going to pay very well. 

The pay that you do earn is deposited into your PayPal account weekly.

Pros


  • You work on your own schedule.
  • You get a second chance if there is an issue with your work, but only before the deadline expires.
  • It’s easy to rise through the ranks and have a more reliable work flow if you keep delivering good work.

Cons


  • The pay leaves much to be desired; it’s too low for the hours you have to put in.
  • Many have reported the customer support department is not very friendly.
  • The platform is not very user-friendly.
  • 24 hour deadline for all projects.


Conclusion


If you're new to this type of work, Babbletype is a great transcription company with money-making potential for those in search of additional income streams. They are free to join, and they do pay their transcriptionists.

The downside according to others is that you might occasionally have to deal with sub-par customer support and put in a lot of hours for little pay. 

It's important to recognize that there's more value to working online than money though.

Of course, money is the ultimate goal... but the skills you learn are what really matter. It's those skills that'll take you to the next level.

Online jobs like Babbletype can be a good stepping stone to bigger things down the road, like earning a passive income with an online business and if more freedom and independence is what you want, knowing how (and where) to get started is what you in order to get what you want

To learn how I do it, I’m going to give you a free step by step beginner's guide to making money online which you can get by clicking HERE.

Of course, if you're not looking for anything serious, you can also make money doing online surveys with sites like Survey Junkie and Inbox Dollars which are free to join. 

I hope this Babbletype review was helpful and if you have any comments, questions or experience with Babbletype, please share in the comments section below. 

Alternative Ways to Make Money Online


Most full-time freelancers and online business owners are great at diversifying. In addition to Babbletype you might want to check out these other work-at-home gigs and side hustles.

And of course, as mentioned above, if you're looking for a little more time and freedom, you may be better suited to a passive income by building your own online business.  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked

  1. @Kate – Maybe they failed you because you tripped some kind of personality red flag, e.g., paranoia. Why would you bother making half a point? What you describe, regarding an insane view on who should be considered a native speaker, becomes more or less moot if we don’t know what country you are talking about. Are you afraid someone will somehow (bother to) come and find you if you reveal your nationality? If some moronic company told me I was a second-language English speaker, I would be publicising their stupidity in full detail, not helping them keep it quiet. By the way, I come from a large yet not densely populated country surrounded by water, somewhere to the west of New Zealand. But I’m not saying where. Something bad might happen.

  2. The part about being a native English speaker is utter garbage. You have to be a native English speaker from one of four or five countries to be accepted.

    Even though I passed the test, they still refused me. According to them, I wasn’t a native English speaker because I wasn’t a national from one of the four or five countries they mentioned.

    Fact: The UK government recognises 18 countries as native English speaking, excluding their overseas territories. My country is not only listed but it’s also one of 16 Commonwealth realms. In truth, I think Babbletype is looking for a particular demographic…

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}