By Jay

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How would you like to make money as a mystery shopper from the comfort of you own home? If you have health issues that make it difficult to work, kids at home or a tough job market, is Call Center QA the answer? It sounds too good to be true, right? And, it might be. At least, as far as Call Center QA is concerned, even though they provide a work-at-home telephone mystery shopping opportunity.

It's being suggested that Call Center QA might be a scam. We did some research to find out… and what we found were mixed reviews and red flags.

Disclaimer:
Please note, I am not a member or an affiliate for Call Center QA. This review has been researched with information and/or testimonials that are available online in the public domain. Any recommendations and/or conclusions are strictly opinions and may not to apply to, or agree with, all persons or situations. 
See full disclaimer for more info


What is Call Center QA?


Supposedly out of Boston MA, Call Center QA claims to provide telephone mystery shopping services for call-center clients to help them get an accurate picture of how their agents are performing.

It sounds legit.

They hire mystery shoppers to work from home and makes outgoing calls to evaluate various call centers.  

In most reviews we include things like how to register, how much it pays, and so on... but, for reasons that will become clear in a moment, this review won't talk about those details. 

Is Call Center QA a Scam?


If you’ve read some Call Center QA reviews you may have stumbled upon some accusations that this is a scam. 

And when they mention the word scam, they don't mean that Call Center QA lacks support or pays too little to make it worthwhile. 

What they are implying is that it's a flat-out scam... A fake company that collects your private information (which would likely be used for identity fraud).

Call Center QA BBB Review

It’s a serious accusation that this review won't make... but that also doesn't mean we recommend them.

The first red flag isn't necessarily the Better Business Bureau complaint shown above, but the fact that Call Center QA has not responded to it. 

The second red flag is also from the Better Business Bureau site, which is that Call Center QA only has one employee.

Certainly... one person can own and run a business... but for a company with the profile of Call Center QA… it seems odd.

Call Center QA BBB registration info

Having only 1 employee for a company with Call Center QA's profile is not odd enough to call them a scam (at least not yet). But it is odd.

When looking for more reviews you can find similar complaints and accusations like the one below.

Always on the lookout for additional ways for people to make money at home, I was hoping to find some clear signs that Call Center QA was legit. So far it's not looking great.

I wouldn't call these "smoking guns" or proof that it's a scam, but it's certainly something to be concerned about and a reason to dig a little deeper to see what's going on here. 

Having said that, if Call Center QA doesn't sound like something you're interested in, you can also make some money doing online surveys with market research companies like Survey Junkie. Another site that offers surveys is Inbox Dollars, and they'll also pay you for doing things like searching the web, watching videos and trying out websites. 

It's not the kind of money you can retire on, but if you've never made money online before, they can be a good place to start. 

For a full-time income, an online business may be something you're looking for.

If you have a health issue for example, kids at home to take care of, or even just a job you hate and would like to quit... a real online income is probably what you want

With so much junk and misinformation out there though, knowing how (and where) to get started is what you need in order to get what you want.

To learn how I did it, I’m going to give you a free step by step beginner's guide to making money online which you can get by clicking HERE.

Getting back to Call Center QA, what we need to do before passing judgement (which I'll leave up to you) is, as mentioned a moment ago... dig a little deeper.


Call Center QA Community


Whenever you’re researching to find out if you're dealing with a scam, a good place to start is the community, in this case, the Call Center QA Facebook page. 

There's not as much activity as you might expect from what's supposed to be a good work-at-home job (that usually have active online communities), but there is some discussion going on there and it seems to be positive.

Maybe a little too positive... or at least repetitive. 

Having said that, Facebook comments and reviews are tougher to fake (than some other review sites) because they require profiles that look real and have history to look legit. 

Call Center QA positive reviews on FB

Despite the positive comments shown above, it's hard to overlook the overall lack of activity and professionalism. There are no images of their offices or staff, and there is no "real" person associated with the account.

In fact, it's even worse... they've used generic stock images which makes it look like they're faking a work environment that doesn't exist. 

Again… not enough to call them a scam (maybe they're just hiding a messy office), but it doesn’t inspire confidence either.


Who Owns Call Center QA?


Of all the Red Flags, this is the biggest. The company apparently as no owner or CEO. At least not one who's willing to admit it.

There are no contact names or department heads on their website, and nothing turns up in a domain search. Call Center QA is using Whois Privacy to hide their identity.

Call Center QS Whois lookup

To be clear, there is nothing unusual with keeping your personal details private. In fact, some domain registrars make privacy the default option.

What's unusual here is that Call Center QA (who is supposed to be a company... not an individual or blog) is hiding their identity.

Another option if you're just looking for some extra spending cash is online surveys. Sites like Survey Junkie and Inbox Dollars will pay you for your opinion, and although it's not a ton of money, it's a simple first step if you're just getting started. 

If you have a medical issue that's keeping you at home though, or little ones to take care of for example... a full-time income online might be what you want

There's so much garbage and get-rich-quick schemes out there though that knowing how (and where) to get started is what you need to get what you want.

To learn how I did it, I’m going to give you a free step by step beginner's guide to making money online which you can get by clicking HERE.


Call Center QA Reviews


An absolute scam is usually easy to identify, and for the most part, Call Center QA has enough red flags to qualify.  

The negative reviews are exceptionally bad… and not responding to those negative reviews is even worse. Especially on the BBB website.

But, not all the reviews are negative.There are some positive ones as well, and some "neutral reviews" which are usually the ones you can trust most...

Call Center QA positive reviews updated

Source: Indeed

We can speculate whether the positive reviews are real or not... and question if they would use fake reviews.

It's not an uncommon practice. There's an entire industry built around writing fake reviews. You can go on freelance markets like Fiverr and buy them.

People Selling Fake Reviews

People also buy negative reviews to harm their competition or get back at company for things like poor service.  

Since we can't really trust any of the reviews (good or bad) we’ll have to stick to what we know; the hidden identity of the company owner, no response to the Better Business Bureau complaint, hiding their website registration details, no company or staff pictures on their Facebook page...


The Mystery Shoppers Professionals
Association


I wanted to check one more thing before passing judgement. I was hoping this “scam question” would be put to rest if Call Center QA was a member of the MSPA (Mystery Shoppers Professionals Association).

Unfortunately, they are not.

Where Do You Go From Here?


I can’t in good conscience recommend Call Center QA, especially when there are so many other great work at home opportunities (including well known and legit mystery shopping gigs).

But, there's also not enough here to accuse them of being scam.

One thing about Call Center QA is that they’re not asking your for money up front, so... if it’s a job you'd still like to pursue, it doesn’t hurt to email them to see if you can establish communication. Let them know your concerns.

It also wouldn't hurt to play it safe by setting up a second email and during the initial tests just in case you want to stop if you find the questions too private or inappropriate.

Your other alternative if some extra "end of the month" money is all you're after, are online surveys. Of course they don't pay a lot of money, but sites like Survey Junkie and Inbox Dollars can be a good first step if you've never made money online before. 

If you have a health issue though, or kids that may be keeping you at home, a more substantial income might be what you want

There's so much BS out there though, and get-rich-quick schemes promising you overnight riches that knowing how (and where) to get started properly is what you need in order to get what you want.

To learn how I did it, I’m going to give you a free step by step beginner's guide to making money online which you can get by clicking HERE.

I hope you found this Call Center QA review helpful and if you have any questions or comments (especially if you’ve worked for them before), please share in the comments section below.

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  1. Hi, I signed up. I did the test call and then I got the information for additional calls. I think what is happening, is that they are getting paid for referrals and then kicking back $5.00 to the person calling. So, not a scam no. But…….I bet they are getting a tidy sum for all the people calling. They require you to use your own information and call all these places asking for information. That means, all of these places will be calling me back to see if I am interested. One of the questions was, did I purchase or sign up and why not if no. I think they get referral fees. That is just my 2 cents.

  2. I’ve been always quite suspicios to such kind of companies and always try to pay attention to red flags, they can be so different. Only lots of positive comments look a bit weird as well, don’t you agree? Like yes, bad reviews aren’t helpful with raising trust but as for me, better have them. And agree with Clare, we should be able identify the problem untill it’s too late and we are left with no money and hours of wasting time

  3. I’ve been trying to get ahold of them for YEARS to buy their domain and their business but nobody ever replies. I don’t think it even exists anymore as nobody has ever been able to establish contact.

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